Cranberry Orange Curd + Gingersnap Tart

 
Cranberry Orange Curd + Gingersnap Tart | All Purpose Flour Child

If you're looking for an easy dessert to make for Thanksgiving that's still pretty but you don't wanna deal with pie crust and all that, I gotcha.  This tart is so pretty (that magenta!) but it's super easy.  It's almost no-bake, too.  I mean, you bake the crust for a few minutes but that's it.  The filling comes together on the stovetop then you just pour it into the shell and you're done.  If you brought this to Thanksgiving, I don't think anyone would be mad.  Cranberry, orange, and ginger are such classic holiday flavors, too.  Can you believe Thanksgiving is almost here??  Seems like it came even faster than usual this year!   


Cranberry Orange Curd + Gingersnap Tart

makes a 12 inch tart

crust 
12 oz gingersnap cookies
4 T unsalted butter, melted
1 t ground cinnamon
1 T molasses
pinch of salt

cranberry curd filling
12 oz whole fresh cranberries, washed
1/4 c water
1/4 c orange juice, freshly squeezed
3/4 c sugar
4 egg yolks
zest of 1 orange
4 T butter, softened and cut into cubes

make the crust
Preheat oven to 350 °F.  In a food processor, pulse the gingersnaps until pulverized into a fine crumb.  Transfer to a mixing bowl and stir in the cinnamon and salt and set aside.  Melt the butter over low heat in a small saucepan then remove from heat and stir in the molasses.  Add the molasses and butter mixture into the gingersnap mixture and stir to combine.  Add to a 12 inch round fluted tart pan with removable bottom and press evenly on the bottom and up the sides, using a round measuring cup or glass to even out the sides.  Bake for about 12-15 minutes, until golden and crisp.  Set aside to cool.

make the cranberry curd filling
In a saucepan over medium heat, combine the cranberries, water, and orange juice.  Cover and allow to simmer gently until cranberries pop and have softened, about 15 minutes.  Strain the cranberries over a mesh strainer and pour the puree back into the saucepan.  Set aside.  Whisk together the egg yolks and sugar until pale in color.  Over medium heat, add the egg mixture in with the cranberry puree and whisk constantly until the consistency thickens enough to coat the back of a spoon.  Remove from heat and stir in the butter and orange zest.  Allow to cool slightly then pour into crust and smooth over with a spatula.  Chill until ready to serve then top with whipped cream and orange zest if you'd like.

Cranberry Orange Curd + Gingersnap Tart | All Purpose Flour Child
Cranberry Orange Curd + Gingersnap Tart | All Purpose Flour Child
Cranberry Orange Curd + Gingersnap Tart | All Purpose Flour Child
Cranberry Orange Curd + Gingersnap Tart | All Purpose Flour Child
Cranberry Orange Curd + Gingersnap Tart | All Purpose Flour Child
Cranberry Orange Curd + Gingersnap Tart | All Purpose Flour Child
Cranberry Orange Curd + Gingersnap Tart | All Purpose Flour Child
Cranberry Orange Curd + Gingersnap Tart | All Purpose Flour Child

Butternut Squash + Caramelized Onion Rigatoni with Apple Cider Cream Sauce + Hazelnuts

 
Butternut Squash + Caramelized Onion Rigatoni with Apple Cider Cream Sauce + Hazelnuts | All Purpose Flour Child

I cannot believe how fast it got cold here!  Like where did Fall go?  It snowed yesterday!  Only for a few minutes but still.  I need a little more Fall before Winter sets in, you know?  No matter what the weather's like where you are, we can pretend it's the coziest of Fall days with this pasta here.  It is seriously like a big hug.  I made a sauce with fresh apple cider and cream and it coats the pasta perfectly.  It's not as heavy as it sounds, either.  It's kinda light.  And the butternut squash and caramelized onions get folded in, too along with crunchy roasted hazelnuts, nutty pecorino and earthy thyme.  So good!  If you wanted to make it a little heartier, I bet some crumbled Italian sausage would be really good in it, too.  


Butternut Squash + Caramelized Onion Rigatoni with Apple Cider Cream Sauce + Hazelnuts 

serves 4

2 c butternut squash, peeled and cut into 1 inch cubes (about 1 small butternut squash)
salt and pepper, to taste
3 T olive oil, divided
1 T unsalted butter, softened
1 large white or yellow onion, thinly sliced
8 oz rigatoni
2 c fresh apple cider (fresh, unfiltered apple juice would work too)
1/2 c heavy cream
shaved Pecorino Romano, for sprinkling on top (or Parmesan!)
1/3 c hazelnuts, roasted and roughly chopped
1 T fresh thyme, roughly chopped

roast the squash + caramelize the onions
Preheat oven to 375 °F.  Toss the squash in a bowl with 2 tablespoons of the olive oil, salt, and pepper.  Spread out evenly in a single layer on a rimmed baking sheet and roast for about 40-45 minutes, until completely tender and slightly caramelized.  While the squash is in the oven, we're going to caramelize the onions.  In a large cast iron skillet over low heat, melt the butter and the remaining tablespoon of olive oil.  Add the onions in a single layer allow to saute a few minutes before stirring.  Stir occasionally just to prevent burning but for the most part just leave them alone to do their thing.  Caramelizing takes time!  Allow to cook for about 30 minutes, or until onions are a deep golden color and taste sweet.  Remove from heat and set aside.  

make the sauce + assemble pasta
Boil the pasta according to the package directions, being sure to generously salt the water right before you add the pasta.  Meanwhile, make the sauce.  In a medium saucepan over high heat, add the apple cider and bring to a boil.  Continue to boil cider has reduced by half.  Turn the heat down to medium and add in the cream.  Continue to cook until mixture has reduced and is thick enough to coat the back of a spoon.  Remove from heat and toss with the pasta, roasted squash, caramelized onions, and chopped thyme.  Top with hazelnuts and shaved Pecorino Romano.

Butternut Squash + Caramelized Onion Rigatoni with Apple Cider Cream Sauce + Hazelnuts | All Purpose Flour Child
Butternut Squash + Caramelized Onion Rigatoni with Apple Cider Cream Sauce + Hazelnuts | All Purpose Flour Child
Butternut Squash + Caramelized Onion Rigatoni with Apple Cider Cream Sauce + Hazelnuts | All Purpose Flour Child
Butternut Squash + Caramelized Onion Rigatoni with Apple Cider Cream Sauce + Hazelnuts | All Purpose Flour Child
Butternut Squash + Caramelized Onion Rigatoni with Apple Cider Cream Sauce + Hazelnuts | All Purpose Flour Child
Butternut Squash + Caramelized Onion Rigatoni with Apple Cider Cream Sauce + Hazelnuts | All Purpose Flour Child

Incorporating Essential Oils Into The Everyday with Vitruvi

 
Incorporating Essential Oils Into The Everyday with Vitruvi | All Purpose Flour Child

If you've been around here for a while or you know me, you'll know I'm pretty into health and wellness.  I'm talking living that organic, non-toxic, pasture-raised kinda lifestyle.  Call me a hippy if you want, I'll own it.  It's a huge part of my lifestyle but I haven't shared it a ton on here for some reason.  So I asked you guys on Insta Stories a few weeks ago if you'd be interested in me sharing more content around this subject and overwhelmingly you were into it!  So expect to see more of it around here.  And if you were one of the few that weren't that into it, hey, no hard feelings!  I'll still be posting plenty of recipes for you here, too so don't feel left out.

I've spent the last couple of years slowly purging toxic products from my life, from cleaning products to beauty and makeup products and even the containers and cookware I store and prepare food in.  Essential oils have been a huge part of making the switch to a non-toxic lifestyle easier and fun! 

For a new post series, I've partnered with a brand I've absolutely fallen in love with and am SO excited to share with you: Vitruvi!  This first post is all about some of my favorite ways to incorporate essential oils into your daily life and why you should.   The next two posts will be easy and useful DIYs for beauty and home!  Yaaassss. I first came across Vitruvi randomly on Instagram a while back and was first struck by the beautiful design of their bottles.  The minimal black and white aesthetic is right up my alley and I love the play on the periodic table, too.  After I visited their website and did some reading, I quickly fell in love.  They create premium, 100% pure and often organic essential oils and believing essential oils should never be so expensive that they feel too precious to use, they're incredibly affordable, too.  So you basically can't lose.  

Vitruvi was created by brother and sister duo Sara and Sean out of a passion for botanicals and design.  They built a company designed for millennial women to help them take care of themselves so they can take on the world.  What a beautiful and inspiring idea, right?  I highly recommend you head over to their site and have a look around.  And check out their newly launched blog, Basenotes.  It's full of visual inspiration and ways to use essential oils if you're not sure where to start!  And keep an eye out for my upcoming DIY posts with Vitruvi, too!  Do you use essential oils?  What are your faves and how do you use them?


Incorporating Essential Oils Into The Everyday with Vitruvi | All Purpose Flour Child
Incorporating Essential Oils Into The Everyday with Vitruvi | All Purpose Flour Child
Incorporating Essential Oils Into The Everyday with Vitruvi | All Purpose Flour Child

I looooove this diffuser.  It's made of hand-crafted porcelain and uses ultrasonic technology to preserve the full integrity of the essential oils.  It has two main modes: a 3 hour continuous mode and a 7.5 hour intermittent mode.  I like to use both depending on what I'm doing.  If I'm working at my desk or bopping around the kitchen, I usually have it on continuous but I like to use the longer intermittent option when I'm going to bed.  It also has an optional LED nightlight band which creates a pretty glow at night, too.

Perhaps my favorite thing about it, though, is how seamlessly it fits into any room in my home.  The clean, modern, minimal design makes it a piece of art in its own right and fits in perfectly with many different aesthetics and I love that I can tuck it anywhere.  I tend to keep it in my living room most often since that's where I spend a lot of my time but I love to pop it on my nightstand before I go to sleep or on my desk if I know I'm going to be hunkering down there for a while getting work done.  I went with the white because I love airy and bright Scandinavian-inspired design but it also comes in classic black, which you can never go wrong with (just ask my closet!) . Which would you pick?

Incorporating Essential Oils Into The Everyday with Vitruvi | All Purpose Flour Child
Incorporating Essential Oils Into The Everyday with Vitruvi | All Purpose Flour Child
Incorporating Essential Oils Into The Everyday with Vitruvi | All Purpose Flour Child
Incorporating Essential Oils Into The Everyday with Vitruvi | All Purpose Flour Child

Diffusing Essential Oils | My Favorite Blends //

Try out these blends in a diffuser and you may be surprised how effective they are!  The power of aromatherapy is incredible!  These are some of my favorites but I encourage you to experiment and try out different combinations to come up with your own.  There's no wrong way to mix and match!  Check out Vitruvi's new blog, Basenotes for all sorts of essential oils inspiration! 


Incorporating Essential Oils Into The Everyday with Vitruvi | All Purpose Flour Child

Get Well //
 

+ peppermint
+ eucalyptus
+ lemon



Whether I just have a tickle in my throat and feel a cold coming on or am in the middle of the full-blown flu, I love diffusing this blend when I'm not feeling the best.  I place my diffuser on my night stand so I can breathe in as much of the scent as possible.  This blend is calming, making it easier to drift off to sleep and I've found it very helpful with clearing respiratory congestion, too. 




 


peppermint | eucalyptus | lemon

Mood Boost //
 

+ grapefruit
+ lemongrass
+ peppermint
+ spruce

This is one of my favorite blends when I'm in full work mode and I'm shooting a bunch of different things for the blog and I need to be active, alert, and focused.  It gives me a little lift and drive to keep going and puts me in a great mood!

 

 

 

 

 

 

grapefruit lemongrass peppermint spruce

Incorporating Essential Oils Into The Everyday with Vitruvi | All Purpose Flour Child
Incorporating Essential Oils Into The Everyday with Vitruvi | All Purpose Flour Child

Cozy //
 

+ rosemary
+ tangerine




I randomly threw this combination together the other evening and I love how it smelled!  It instantly reminded me of cozy Winter evenings.  Curl up with a cup of tea, throw this blend in the diffuser, and get cozy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

rosemary | tangerine

Sleep //
 

+ lavender
+ geranium



This is my favorite blend to diffuse when I'm crawling into bed.  Lavender is synonymous with rest and relaxation and geranium is my favorite scent of all the essential oils so I just find it comforting in this blend.  The result is a soothing blend to drift off to sleep to.

 

 

 

 

 

 

lavender | geranium

Incorporating Essential Oils Into The Everyday with Vitruvi | All Purpose Flour Child

Roll-On, Babe //

These little roll-ons are like little essential oil powerhouses tucked into your bag or desk drawer.  Each is specially blended to evoke a certain mood or emotion and they really do work!  They all also come in a mist if that's more your jam.


Incorporating Essential Oils Into The Everyday with Vitruvi | All Purpose Flour Child

Focus Roll-On //

pairs well with multi-tasking + cleaning out that inbox

 

 

I keep this at my desk at work and have gotten in the habit of swiping on my wrists first thing in the morning to focus my thoughts and get me into work mode.  It's made with a blend of Rosemary, Lemongrass, Basil, and Clove to trigger parts of the brain that help with focus and decision making.  How awesome, right?!


Incorporating Essential Oils Into The Everyday with Vitruvi | All Purpose Flour Child

Wake Roll-On //

pairs well with coffee and your to-do list

 

This is an invigorating herbal blend with notes of juniper, eucalyptus, rosemary, and black pepper that will make you feel energized and ready to take on the day.  It's great for swiping on your wrists or temples while you're getting ready in the morning and to jump-start your day.  

Still Roll-On //

pairs well with a quiet moment + getting lost in thought

 

I could honestly wear this scent as a perfume, it smells so delicious!  Notes of mandarin, frankincense, rose, geranium, and vetiver all combine to create an intoxicating and comforting scent that's floral, woodsy, and slightly spicy all at once.  The combination is grounding, encouraging you to slow down for a moment and take a deep breath.  Kinda like meditation in a bottle.  

 

Incorporating Essential Oils Into The Everyday with Vitruvi | All Purpose Flour Child

This post was crafted in collaboration with Vitruvi.  Thank you for supporting the brands that support me!


Chai-Spiced Apple Crumble

 
Chai-Spiced Apple Crumble | All Purpose Flour Child

I was at Trader Joe's yesterday picking up the apples for this crumble and I almost started bawling, right there in front of the organic lemons.  I'm not even exaggerating.  A little elderly lady was slowly making her way over to the pears, and another woman came up to her and said something to her I couldn't quite hear.  But then I saw this look of pure gratitude wash across the sweet little elderly lady's face and she nodded with a huge, thankful smile and said "yes, thank you so much".  The woman bent down and tied the elderly lady's untied shoe and the small little act of kindness made me catch my breath.  Not just the gesture itself, but the look of shock and pure appreciation across the elderly lady's face made me happy and sad all at once.  Happy that someone cared enough to make sure that sweet little lady didn't trip in the grocery store and sad that I don't witness more acts of kindness like this, or carry more of them out myself.  And you know what?  The woman who'd helped the elderly lady just went about her grocery shopping after that, like it was nothing.  And it was nothing but it was also everything.  To that sweet little lady who could barely shuffle a few feet away from her cart let alone bend down to tie her shoe, it made her light up.  But it was also nothing, just the bare minimum of human decency.  The whole thing got me thinking how we could all stand to be a little kinder to each other, and not just around the holidays when everyone becomes their best selves but all the time.  Let's just be kinder and love better.  Lord knows I need to.  Anyway, sorry for getting kinda deep.  And you just showed up for a dessert recipe, right?   

So, this crumble.  I really wanted to focus on Thanksgiving desserts this year that were irresistibly good but with minimal fussing and effort.  Helloooo, crumble.  The chai spices are cozy and warm, which are a perfect match for apples and there just aren't many things better than a warm, crisp, gooey fruit crumble with cold, creamy vanilla ice cream, right?  Like seriously.  Name a better combination.  I thought so.  Are you in charge of making anything for Thanksgiving this year?  Tell me in the comments!


Chai-Spiced Apple Crumble 

serves 8

filling
6 medium/large-ish apples, peeled, cored, and roughly chopped (I used gala)
1 T fresh lemon juice
1/4 c brown sugar
2 T flour
pinch salt
1 1/2 t spice mix (recipe below)

topping
1/2 c unsalted butter, cold and cubed (1 stick)
1 c rolled oats
1 c all-purpose flour
1/2 c brown sugar
big pinch salt
1 1/2 t spice mix (recipe below)

spice mix
2 t ground cinnamon
1/2 t ground ginger
1/4 t ground cardamom
1/4 c black pepper
pinch ground cloves
pinch ground allspice

Preheat oven to 350 °F.  In a small bowl, mix together all the spices for the spice mix and set aside.  In a large bowl, toss together the apples with lemon juice, brown sugar, flour and 1 and 1/2 teaspoons of the spice mixture (about half the mixture).  Pour into baking pan.  Using the same bowl, whisk together the oats, flour, brown sugar, salt, and remainder of the spice mix for the topping.  Add in the butter cubes and, using your hands, squeeze the butter into the flour mixture until the butter is incorporated and the mixture is crumbly.  Sprinkle the crumble topping evenly over the apples and bake for about 35-40 minutes, until the top is golden brown and filling is bubbling up the sides of the pan.  Allow to cool slightly before serving.  And serve with vanilla ice cream, duh.

Chai-Spiced Apple Crumble | All Purpose Flour Child
Chai-Spiced Apple Crumble | All Purpose Flour Child
Chai-Spiced Apple Crumble | All Purpose Flour Child
Chai-Spiced Apple Crumble | All Purpose Flour Child
Chai-Spiced Apple Crumble | All Purpose Flour Child
Chai-Spiced Apple Crumble | All Purpose Flour Child
Chai-Spiced Apple Crumble | All Purpose Flour Child
Chai-Spiced Apple Crumble | All Purpose Flour Child
Chai-Spiced Apple Crumble | All Purpose Flour Child

Five Spice Applesauce + Yogurt Parfaits

 
Five Spice Applesauce + Yogurt Parfaits | All Purpose Flour Child

Homemade applesauce is a memory synonymous in my mind with crisp Fall days and the start of the school year.  I can remember riding the bus home from school in my new dress, walking home from the bus stop, itching to take my scratchy tights off, my Winnie The Pooh backpack thumping against my back as I raced the neighbor kids home.  I opened the front door, past the pumpkins and family scarecrow named Newman sitting on the porch, simultaneously kicking off my patent black dress shoes and letting my backpack slide down to the floor.  Standing in the entry way, I was immediately met with the smell of warm applesauce and cinnamon wafting down the hallway.  I walked into the kitchen and was greeted by my mom who was stirring a big pot on the stove.  Not many things are as comforting to me as a bowl of warm, homemade applesauce.  The texture and flavor is far superior to that of store-bought.  I don't know where I picked up this habit, and I feel like it's weird but I like to add a splash of milk to the warm applesauce.  I like the contrast of the creamy dairy flavor against the sharp, slightly acidic applesauce.  It rounds it out in the most delicious way.  So applesauce and yogurt parfaits are like the grown-up, sophisticated version of that.  And so tasty!

My parents have a few little apple trees in their back yard so each Fall I take a big basket home.  The first thing I whip up is a batch of homemade applesauce.  It's the easiest thing to make, it just takes some time and a little patience.  Put on a good movie, peel and chop away, then just let it cook down on the stove low and slow until the apples have been transformed into a delicious, spoonable delight.  When I make homemade applesauce, I normally like to keep it simple and sweeten just with a little honey at the end, only if it needs it.  The apples from my parent's trees this year were particularly sweet so I left it unsweetened but feel free to add some honey or maple syrup if you'd prefer.  Instead of the normal sprinkling of cinnamon I usually sprinkle in, I reached for some five spice seasoning which is still warm and cozy but is a little unexpected and totally delicious.  Five spice is a delicious blend of cinnamon, clove, star anise, fennel, and black pepper and compliments the apples really well.  It's worth it to make a big batch as well since it freezes beautifully.


Five Spice Applesauce + Yogurt Parfaits 

makes about 4 quarts of applesauce and 4 parfaits

applesauce
4 pounds apples, peeled, cored, and roughly chopped
3 t five spice powder (or a blend of cinnamon, clove, star anise, fennel, and black pepper)

parfaits
1 c applesauce, divided
4 c plain whole milk yogurt, divided
granola of choice (here's my favorite, or my apple ginger granola would be delish too!)


make the applesauce
Add the apples to a large heavy-bottomed pot and cook on low with the lid on, stirring periodically until apples are completely broken down and mostly smooth, about 2 hours or so.  I like my applesauce with some texture so a few small pieces of apple are ok for me but if you prefer a more smooth consistency, you can puree it in a blender.  Once applesauce reaches desired consistency, remove from heat and stir in the five spice.  Allow to cool then store in airtight container in fridge until ready to use.  It also freezes beautifully.

make the parfaits
In a glass or jar, pour about 1/2 cup of yogurt followed by a 1/4 cup of applesauce.  Top with another 1/2 cup of yogurt and sprinkle with granola.

Five Spice Applesauce + Yogurt Parfaits | All Purpose Flour Child
Five Spice Applesauce + Yogurt Parfaits | All Purpose Flour Child
Five Spice Applesauce + Yogurt Parfaits | All Purpose Flour Child
Five Spice Applesauce + Yogurt Parfaits | All Purpose Flour Child
Five Spice Applesauce + Yogurt Parfaits | All Purpose Flour Child

Roasted Garlic Turkey Meatballs + Zoodles

 
Roasted Garlic Turkey Meatballs + Zoodles | All Purpose Flour Child

These are my new favorite meatballs.  When I make something for the blog, especially a meal, I try to work it into my meal plan for the week but after I cook and test and shoot the same thing for a few days, that's usually the last thing I want to eat, even if it's delicious.  But when I tested the recipe for these the first time, I ate them for dinner every night until they were gone and did not get sick of them.  They are that good. 

They are lighter than typical beef and pork meatballs, but still totally flavorful, moist, and fluffy!  The chicken sausage adds a ton of flavor, the little bit of thick yogurt (sounds weird but trust!) adds moisture and keeps them light in texture, and the sweet roasted garlic adds a flavor bomb!  So good!  I really like baking them because you don't have to deal with the mess of frying them on the stove top and babysitting them to flip every so often.  Just pop 'em in the oven and let them do their thing.

The combination with the zoodles made me feel really great afterwards, too.  I felt full and completely satisfied but still light and not like I wanted to just curl up on the couch and take a nap.  Pasta will do that to ya, even a brown rice or quinoa pasta (or at least me!).  But the lightness of the zoodles is perfect, plus it's an easy way to incorporate another serving of vegetables into the meal, which is awesome.  If you don't like zucchini, try using sweet potatoes instead.  The tomato sauce is quick and easy to throw together but still full of great flavor.  It's a great compromise between cracking open a jar of store-bought marinara and simmering your grandma's recipe all day long.  Cause nobody has time for that on a weeknight.  I hope you make these and enjoy!


Roasted Garlic Turkey Meatballs + Zoodles 

makes about 20 2 inch meatballs

meatballs
1 lb ground turkey
1/2 lb sweet italian chicken sausage (about 3 large links, casings removed)
2 heads garlic
olive oil, for drizzling
1/2 c plain whole milk greek or skyr style yogurt (I used Siggi's 4% because I like the thickness)
1/2 c bread crumbs
1 t fennel seeds
2 t dried oregano (or 1 t fresh)
2 t fresh thyme, finely chopped
big pinch red pepper flakes
1 egg, lightly beaten
big pinch of salt

sauce
2 T olive oil
3 cloves garlic, finely chopped
2 28oz cans crushed tomatoes, unsalted
2 T tomato paste
1 t organic cane sugar
2 t dried oregano
big pinch red pepper flakes
salt, to taste
2 T grass fed butter, unsalted
4 medium zucchinis, spiralized (here's my favorite spiralizer!)
grated parmesan, for sprinkling on top (optional)

roast the garlic
Preheat oven to 400 °F.  Slice the very top off both heads of garlic, just enough to expose the top of the cloves.  Place on the foil and drizzle tops with olive oil.  Wrap the garlic up in the foil like a little parcel and place on a baking sheet and roast for about 45 minutes to an hour, or until garlic is completely tender and golden in color.  Reduce oven temperature to 375 °F.  While the garlic is still warm, squeeze the base of the bulb to squeeze the cloves out onto a small plate.  Repeat with second head of garlic.  With a fork, mash the garlic into a paste.

make the meatballs
Line a rimmed baking tray with parchment and set aside.  Combine the turkey, chicken sausage, yogurt, breadcrumbs, fennel, oregano, thyme, red pepper flakes, salt, egg, and garlic paste in a large bowl.  Gently stir the mixture together until well combined.  Using an ice cream scoop, form the meatballs and space out about an inch apart on the baking tray.  I used about a 2 inch scoop but these are your meatballs so make them whatever size you'd like!  Drizzle the meatballs with a little olive oil and bake for about 20 minutes, until lightly golden on top and internal temperature is at least 165 °F.  

make the sauce
While the meatballs are roasting, heat the olive oil over medium heat in a large, heavy-bottomed pot.  Add the garlic and saute for about a minute, until lightly golden and fragrant.  Add in the crushed tomatoes and stir to incorporate the garlic.  Add in the tomato paste, sugar, oregano, red pepper flakes, and salt and stir to combine.  Let the sauce simmer for as long as the meatballs roast (about 20 minutes), then stir in the salt and butter.  Cut off the heat.

to serve
Add the roasted meatballs to the sauce and toss to coat.  Ladle some sauce and a few meatballs over the zoodles.  Enjoy!

Roasted Garlic Turkey Meatballs + Zoodles | All Purpose Flour Child
Roasted Garlic Turkey Meatballs + Zoodles | All Purpose Flour Child
Roasted Garlic Turkey Meatballs + Zoodles | All Purpose Flour Child
Roasted Garlic Turkey Meatballs + Zoodles | All Purpose Flour Child
Roasted Garlic Turkey Meatballs + Zoodles | All Purpose Flour Child
Roasted Garlic Turkey Meatballs + Zoodles | All Purpose Flour Child
Roasted Garlic Turkey Meatballs + Zoodles | All Purpose Flour Child
Roasted Garlic Turkey Meatballs + Zoodles | All Purpose Flour Child

*this post contains affiliate links


Triple Apple Babka

 
Triple Apple Babka | All Purpose Flour Child

I was lucky enough to snag some delicious end of season apples from my parent's trees last time I was visiting and I knew exactly how I wanted to use them.  First, I made this bread, which we'll discuss more in a moment, but I also made a huge batch of applesauce, yum.  I made a really delicious twist on classic applesauce and I'll have the recipe you here in a couple weeks so stay tuned!  

Ok, so this bread.  What is a babka?  It's an Eastern-European enriched dough akin to brioche or challah, filled with traditionally either a chocolate or cinnamon filling, then twisted and baked to golden brown perfection.  My version is packed full of apples.  It's stuffed with apple butter and cooked apple chunks and then it gets brushed with an apple cider glaze when it's fresh and warm from the oven.  The edges get crisp and flaky from the butter and the inside stays a little squidgy with all the delicious filling.  This is such a delicious treat to make for a cozy Fall morning to enjoy with a cup of coffee or even hot cider.  Yum!


Triple Apple Babka

makes a 9x5 inch loaf

for the dough
1/2 c whole milk
1 package active dry yeast (2 1/4 t) 
2 t organic cane sugar
2 c all purpose flour
1 egg, room temperature
1/2 t himalayan pink salt
1/2 c unsalted butter, room temperature (1 stick)

for the filling
1 c apples, chopped into 1/4 in cubes
1/2 c store-bought apple butter
2 T brown sugar
2 t cinnamon, divided
pinch of salt

for the glaze
3 T organic cane sugar
3 T fresh apple cider  

Make the dough
In a saucepan over medium-low heat the milk to about 100 degrees, being careful not to let it boil.  Remove from heat and add to the bowl of a stand mixer along with the yeast, sugar, and 1/2 cup of the flour.  Allow to stand for about 5 minutes, until the yeast is slightly bubbly.  

With the mixer fitted with the dough hook and the mixer on low, stir in the egg.  Add in the remaining 1 1/2 cups of flour along with the salt and mix to combine.  Add the butter, about a tablespoon at a time until fully incorporated.  Let the dough knead on low for about 5 to 8 minutes, until the dough is smooth and in one uniform ball.  Place the dough in a greased bowl, cover with a towel, and allow to rise in a warm and cozy place until doubled in size, about 2 hours.  

Make the Filling
In a medium saucepan over low heat, cook the apples for about 10 to 15 minutes, until tender but still holding their shape.  Turn off the heat and stir in a teaspoon of the cinnamon and allow to cool.  While the apples are cooking, stir together the brown sugar and remaining teaspoon of cinnamon and set aside.

Assemble the Babka
Line a 9 by 5 inch loaf pan with parchment paper, leaving excess on the sides to easily pull the babka out later.  Roll the dough out on a floured surface into about a 12 inch by 16 inch rectangle.  Spread the apple butter in a thin layer all over the surface of the dough.  Sprinkle over the cinnamon and brown sugar mixture followed by the apples, scattering them evenly over the surface.  With the longer side facing towards you, begin rolling the dough on itself until you end up with a log, like you would if you were making cinnamon rolls.  Place the log onto a parchment or wax paper-lined baking sheet and pop in the freezer for about 15 minutes.  This will make it easier to slice.  Remove the babka from the freezer and with a sharp knife, slice the log in half vertically, exposing the stripes of dough and filling.  Twist the two halves of the log together, with the cut sides facing up.  Carefully lift the dough into the loaf pan and reshape to fit.  Cover with a towel and allow to rise another two hours or so, until doubled in size.  

Preheat oven to 375°F.  Bake for about 30-40 minutes, until the babka is deeply golden and a skewer inserted into the center comes out clean.  While the babka bakes, make the glaze by combining the sugar and apple cider in a small saucepan and bring to a boil over medium heat.  Allow to cool and set aside.  When the babka comes out of the oven and it's still warm, brush the glaze on all over the surface of the babka.  Allow to cool then slice and enjoy!

*recipe for dough adapted from Amanda Frederickson

Triple Apple Babka | All Purpose Flour Child
Triple Apple Babka | All Purpose Flour Child
Triple Apple Babka | All Purpose Flour Child
Triple Apple Babka | All Purpose Flour Child
Triple Apple Babka | All Purpose Flour Child
Triple Apple Babka | All Purpose Flour Child
Triple Apple Babka | All Purpose Flour Child
Triple Apple Babka | All Purpose Flour Child
Triple Apple Babka | All Purpose Flour Child
Triple Apple Babka | All Purpose Flour Child
Triple Apple Babka | All Purpose Flour Child
Triple Apple Babka | All Purpose Flour Child
Triple Apple Babka | All Purpose Flour Child
Triple Apple Babka | All Purpose Flour Child
Triple Apple Babka | All Purpose Flour Child

All Purpose Essentials | Kitchen Tools

 
All Purpose Essentials | Kitchen Tools | All Purpose Flour Child

I'm really excited to share this post with you guys today.  My hope is that you find it helpful or at least interesting.  I'm starting a new series called All Purpose Essentials where I share you guessed it: my essentials for various assorted subjects.  Today we're starting with the basics.  I compiled a list of my most used and favorite kitchen tools.  And man was it hard!  I didn't realize how many tools and gadgets I genuinely reach for often until I started pulling things for this post!  Some other posts I'm already working on in this series are my pantry staples and food styling props.  What other essentials would you like to see?  Tell me in the comments!

 

the workhorses //

All Purpose Essentials | Kitchen Tools | All Purpose Flour Child
All Purpose Essentials | Kitchen Tools | All Purpose Flour Child
All Purpose Essentials | Kitchen Tools | All Purpose Flour Child

Staub 5.5 QT dutch oven
This may be my favorite piece in my entire kitchen, even above my Kitchenaid mixer.  Staub is known for making high-quality, heavy-duty pieces that stand the test of time so even though it was spendy, I had no hesitation investing in this beauty.  It was on my wishlist for quite a while, too.  I imagine it sitting on my stove, many years from now, slightly worn but ever as useful.  I like the idea of it staying with me through all my culinary endeavors.  And man, is this thing the epitome of a work horse.  I use it ALL THE TIME.  I've roasted whole chickens in it, boiled my eggs in it, made sauces, soups, jams, and even baked homemade sourdough bread in it!  It does it all and the enamel-coated cast iron distributes heat so evenly for perfect cooking every single time.  It's oven-safe, too which makes it even more versatile.  The size is pretty great, too.  It's large enough for all sorts of different things without being so big and cumbersome that it's a chore to lug it out each time you need it.  I have my eye on many more Staub pieces to add to my collection (like this and this and these) but this is a great one to start with. And yes, it is damn pretty, too.  That said, there are definitely other brands that are equally beautiful and high-quality like Le Creuset and even Lodge. I'm just partial to Staub.

All Purpose Essentials | Kitchen Tools | All Purpose Flour Child

glass mixing bowls
These may seem kind of obvious but having heavy-duty glass mixing bowls are a must for me.  I love the variety of sizes and use them all for making any sort of sauce, salad, dough, batter, you name it!  And I would definitely recommend glass over plastic here as it's durable and will stand the test of time, where as plastic may become scratched and worn, and can even get into your food.  Gross.  I really like this one from Ikea, too.  So cute and the little pour spout makes it functional, too.

 

 

 

All Purpose Essentials | Kitchen Tools | All Purpose Flour Child
All Purpose Essentials | Kitchen Tools | All Purpose Flour Child

Lodge 10 inch skillet + Lodge 12 inch skillet + Lodge Pro-Logic 12 inch skillet
I can't say enough good things about cast iron.  I recently made the switch to using almost all non-toxic cookware so I tossed all my non-stick/teflon-coated pots and pans except for one skillet, which I pretty much just use for eggs. Everything else I'm sautéing or cooking on the stove is almost always cooked in one of these babies.  There's a reason your grandma swore by a cast-iron vessel: it's tried and true.  They're very affordable and they'll last a lifetime.  Although I have 3 and use them all, if you're just getting started, that's totally not necessary.  I'd recommend starting with the 12 inch because it's a great size for a variety of things from searing steaks and other meats, roasting or sautéing vegetables, baking salmon, or baking biscuits or cornbread.  It's so handy that they can go from stove to oven, too.  The Pro-Logic one is nice, though because it has a more modern rounded shape which makes it easier to get in the sides of the pan when you're stirring things around. I'd recommend picking up a couple of these little guys, too.  They make cleaning up afterwards so easy.

All Purpose Essentials | Kitchen Tools | All Purpose Flour Child

I was lucky enough to inherit some high-quality stainless steel pots and pans from my mom and aunt when I moved out.  I don't use them too terribly often but they are a great alternative to non-stick if you're cooking something a little more delicate that may not be suited for cast iron if your skillet isn't 100% seasoned yet. Things like eggs or pancakes cook great in stainless steel. They're also oven-proof, which is a great plus.  You can find some similar ones here and here to the ones I have.

Dansk Kobensyle 2 QT saucepan
This was the saucepan I replaced my non-stick ones with when I tossed them and I am in love with it.  Leave it to the Danish to create the most beautiful cooking pot imaginable.  Minimal, functional, beautiful design.  With a 2 quart capacity, it's actually much bigger than it looks and the non-stick enamel coating is great for making all sorts of things.  I've already melted chocolate in it for a ganache and cooked a batch of farro.  The lid also doubles as a trivet.  Now that's genius design right there.  And just like my Staub Cocotte, it's also made to last for years so again, I feel ok in splurging a little more for something I'll have and cherish for a long time.


baking + roasting //

All Purpose Essentials | Kitchen Tools | All Purpose Flour Child

half sheet pan + quarter sheet pan
These guys get a ton of use in my kitchen.  I use the big one for roasting and baking pretty much everything from veggies to meatballs to cookies and scones.  The little one is perfect for just popping something small in the oven like toasting bread or just making a smaller batch for something.  My favorite ones (linked above) are made by Nordic Ware and they are sturdy and super affordable. 

All Purpose Essentials | Kitchen Tools | All Purpose Flour Child

wire cooling rack + round wire cooling rack
I use the big rectangular cooling rack for cooling things like cookies and cakes, obviously but it's also handy for allowing the excess of a glaze or drizzle on something to drip off baked goods (like a scone or bundt cake) and even for roasting something in the oven you want heat to circulate around all sides on, like sweet potato fries.  Just pop it on top of a half sheet pan and voila!  I use the smaller round one for cooling cakes or pies and honestly a lot in my photography because it's pretty! 

All Purpose Essentials | Kitchen Tools | All Purpose Flour Child

Staub baking dishes + Pyrex baking dish
If it isn't already obvious, I am OBSESSED with all things Staub.  I love these little baking dishes and use them a ton.  Just check out these posts here, here, and here!  They are great for baking things like breads and brownies, but they're also great for making ice cream and marinating meats.

I like the Pyrex one because a 9 x 13 inch pan is essential for making brownies and other bars, enchiladas, and all kinds of other things.  Plus it comes with a lid which is handy for traveling if you're making something to make and share.

All Purpose Essentials | Kitchen Tools | All Purpose Flour Child

loaf tin +  muffin tin + mini muffin tin
Having a couple loaf pans in your collection are great for making banana breads, cakes or a mini batch of bars.  

Muffin tins are great if you make muffins or cupcakes a lot.  I like using the mini one a lot, too.  They're great for holding little chocolate treats while they're firming up, like these.


Measuring + weighing //

All Purpose Essentials | Kitchen Tools | All Purpose Flour Child

assorted glass measuring cups
I highly recommend having at least a couple glass measuring pitchers, especially in varying sizes.  Glass is great not only because it's non-toxic but also because it's heatproof (just make sure it's tempered glass).  I use these all the time not just for measuring liquid ingredients for recipes but also for whisking up sauces or melting things like coconut oil or butter. You honestly can't go wrong with Pyrex, it's timeless, durable, and affordable

measuring cups + measuring spoons
Measuring spoons and cups are a must, especially if you're into baking.  I prefer metal to plastic because again non-toxic but also they are nice and sturdy. These ones are so pretty and heavy duty but I also have a more affordable set from Target here and here and I love them, too!

All Purpose Essentials | Kitchen Tools | All Purpose Flour Child

digital scale
This is an essential for sure if you bake.  Measuring by weight rather than volume ensures exact measurements.  I often refer back to European recipes, which are almost always written with measurements in grams.  I also use it to measure out the flour and water when I feed my sourdough starter every week and it's handy for weighing things like chopped chocolate.

candy thermometer + meat thermometer
A candy thermometer is a great tool to have if you ever make candy like this or caramel sauces or you like to deep-fry things on occasion.  A meat thermometer is handy for checking the internal temperature of meats (duh), especially poultry and pork, since you can get sick if they don't reach the minimum cooking temp.


Stirring | whisking | scooping | swirling | flipping //

All Purpose Essentials | Kitchen Tools | All Purpose Flour Child

assorted whisks
I have an embarrassing amount of whisks. The above photo is just a sampling.  But guess what, I use them ALL!  I love using the little guys for whisking up little sauces and vinaigrettes and the big ones for batters, eggs, etc.  The silicone-coated one is handy for using in my enamel-coated pots so I don't scratch the coating.

All Purpose Essentials | Kitchen Tools | All Purpose Flour Child

fish spatula + microplane
I bought the fish spatula out of necessity.  I needed a metal spatula that was heatproof for flipping things in my cast-iron skillets.  Contrary to the name, though, it's great for all kinds of stuff besides just fish, like cookies, and anything you're roasting in the oven. My microplane is one of my hands-down favorites.  I use it all the time for grating parm, garlic cloves, ginger, and any sort of citrus zest.  It's priceless.

mini mesh strainer + spider
The mini strainer is handy for straining out things with seeds and for dusting powdered sugar over treats. The spider is awesome for fishing things like boiled eggs out of boiling water or fried things out of hot oil. It's like a slotted spoon only better.

All Purpose Essentials | Kitchen Tools | All Purpose Flour Child

ice cream scoops
I use these for scooping exact amounts of batter for things like cookies and muffins.  It makes it super easy and less messy than spoons.  It's nice to have different sizes depending on what size treat you're making.

All Purpose Essentials | Kitchen Tools | All Purpose Flour Child

assorted wooden spoons
I love using wooden spoons for stirring around stuff I'm sauteing in a skillet, stirring a soup or sauce over the stove, and countless other things.  The ones linked above I used to make my DIY painted ones here but I also love the ones from Crate + Barrel here.  They're made in France and super durable.

rubber spatulas
I'm a weirdo about not wasting a drop of batter or dough so I always like to scrape out every last drop of something.  Rubber spatulas are the best for that. I love the mini ones at Target, too.


One Hit Wonders But so handy //
 

I pride myself on not having a ton of useless gadgets.  Maybe it's just because I have limited space and I hate clutter but I just don't understand the point of having a bunch of stuff with only one purpose.  They all kinda remind me of as-seen-on-TV gimicky kinda stuff that can usually be replaced with a good knife.  Garlic press? Why, when I have a sharp knife?  Strawberry huller?  How about a paring knife.  Avocado or mango pitter? Apple slicer?  Guess what I could use instead of those?  A knife.  But, these here are the exceptions.  I love these one-use gadgets and I use them so much, I deem them worth it.  

All Purpose Essentials | Kitchen Tools | All Purpose Flour Child

spiralizer
I think we all know at this point that making noodles out of various vegetables is having a moment.  And for good reason: it's a fun and healthy way to replace pasta, as much as we all love it.  I actually had a more complicated vegetable spiralizer with a bunch of different attachments and a hand crank.  It was a pain to clean and I wasn't really impressed with the results, either.  I came across this simple little hand spiralizer and it is AMAZING.  It's so easy to use: you just twist whatever vegetable you're using (my fave is zucchini) and perfect, long vegetable strands come out the other end.  There's very little waste and it's so easy to clean!  I usually just rinse it off and toss it in the dishwasher.  It's really small so storing it isn't an issue, either.  I seriously can't recommend this gadget enough!  

citrus squeezer
I love this so much, I actually have two.  I've mentioned it before, but I drink hot lemon water while I'm getting ready for work every morning and these things are a lifesaver.  They get every drop of juice out of lemons or limes (or even smaller oranges) and hold the seeds back.  I also just use lemon in a lot of my cooking so these really come in handy and they make juicing efficient and contain the mess.  Win-win!

Dansk butter warmer
Ok, I'm cheating a little here because this isn't actually a one-use item but it is specific and kind of an extra.  But I love it!  I originally bought it to mostly use as a prop in photos but I have ended up using it a ton for warming up bone broth to sip on, almond milk for making golden milk, melting coconut oil or ghee, and even melting chocolate or warming honey. It's two of my favorite things: beautiful and functional.


storing //

All Purpose Essentials | Kitchen Tools | All Purpose Flour Child

mason jars
I will be the first to say it: I'm addicted to jars.  Of all sorts of sizes, shapes, and varieties.  I don't discriminate.  I use them for storing all kinds of leftovers as well as a lot of my baking ingredients like nuts, flours, and sugars.  My most-used ones are probably the 1 pint wide-mouth size.  I take oatmeal and yogurt to work in them for breakfast and use them as drinking glasses, too.  I know, how hipster of me.

glasslock containers
I keep and store leftover food and meal-prepped items in these as well as taking my salads for lunch to work in them.  I ditched all my plastic tupperware and use just these now and I love them.

stasher bags
These are so cool!  They are basically a silicone re-usable baggie.  They are a healthy and less wasteful alternative to plastic zip-lock bags, which I do still use but much less often now.  I use them to store leftover avocado halves, for toting snacks like sliced apples or nuts to work, and anything you'd normally toss in a plastic bag.  They are diswasher safe too so they are a breeze to clean.  They come in a few different sizes and I'm eyeing this set here.


appliances  //

All Purpose Essentials | Kitchen Tools | All Purpose Flour Child

blender + food processor
I'm just gonna come right out and say it.  She ain't pretty.  I know it's not all about looks but if I'm being honest, aesthetics are important to me.  Especially with a small kitchen, a lot of the stuff I use is out on my countertops or open metro shelving so if I have to look at it all the time, I want it to be pretty.   I don't think you should have to sacrifice aesthetics for utility.  I believe the design of a piece should be both beautiful and functional. That said, there's a thing called budget so sometimes compromising is necessary.  While there are things I like about my Ninja, I honestly wouldn't recommend it, but I linked it in case you're still interested because I do know some people that like it.  But in my experience, I've only had it a little over 2 years and I've had to replace the pitcher three times!  Three!  It cracks if you blend ice, which, in my humble opinion, should not happen with a blender. The overall design is clunky and the pitcher can be annoying to clean because of all the crevices and the motor is FREAKING LOUD. Like, sometimes I have to cover my ears if I'm blending frozen fruit or something.  It sounds like I'm blending up gravel or rocks.  

That said, there are things I do like about it. The blade comes out which makes it convenient for cleaning.  The pitcher is big so I can make huge batches of things in one go.  It came with 3 smaller bullet-style containers to blend things in, which is handy if I've dirtied the big pitcher and I want to make a smoothie or quick sauce or something.  And my favorite thing: it has a separate food processor pitcher that connects to the same motor base, which is great for my little kitchen right now.  One base and two appliances is nice.  But a Vitamix is still on my wishlist.  After using my mom's a lot, I can say it's just better.  It is prettier for sure, too but the motor is stronger and it blends things a lot more smoothly, too.  Here's the one I've been eyeing.  

All Purpose Essentials | Kitchen Tools | All Purpose Flour Child

Kitchenaid hand mixer + Kitchenaid stand mixer 
The stand mixer seems to be like the ultimate eye candy for a kitchen counter.  It's definitely not an essential for everyone, but if you're fairly into cooking and baking, I say go for it.  I use mine a ton for a variety of baking projects but it's especially nice for when you're whipping or kneading things for an extended period of time.  I haven't branched out into all the attachments you can get for it but I like knowing I have the option.  And have you seen the mini one they have now?!  So dang cute and perfect if you don't have the space for a larger one. Personally, this bad boy will be my next one.

The hand mixer is perfect for whipping up whipped cream, egg whites, mashed potatoes, or even just cookie batter.  I don't use mine too terribly often but it definitely comes in handy when I need it. 

So, what are your kitchen essentials?  I'd love to hear them! 

*this post contains some affiliate links


Maple-Roasted Sheet Pan Chicken with Caramelized Acorn Squash + Fennel

 
Maple-Roasted Sheet Pan Chicken with Caramelized Acorn Squash + Fennel | All Purpose Flour Child

I saw Coldplay this past weekend and it was such an incredible show!  I love them so much.  It was my third time seeing them live and they only seem to get better.  It was at CenturyLink Field where the Seahawks play so it was a great venue too.  I hate being in stuffy arenas so it was nice to be in the fresh open air.  The first time I saw them was at the Gorge and that will probably be hands-down the best concert I'll ever go to cause I mean, you can't top that view.

The only downside to the concert was there were 4 drunk loudmouths sitting behind us talk-yelling throughout the whole concert. Like why did you even come if you just wanted to talk the whole time?!  One of the ladies even got a little too rambunctious and smacked me on the top of the head with her iPhone when she was trying to take a selfie. Ugh.  But it was still so good!  Fireworks, balloons, confetti, and Chris brings the best energy to pump up the crowd.  I made this chicken the next day and sent a bunch home with my sister to have for her lunch for school the next day.  She sent me a snap when she got back to her dorm of the chicken bones with the caption "so good!".  So much for lunch, haha!  But OMG is it good so I don't blame her.

This chicken is the perfect cozy Fall dinner and really handy to have up your sleeve for a weeknight because it's low maintenance and super easy to throw together after work.  I actually made this again on Tuesday because my parents and aunt came up for my sister's nursing school consecration and I whipped it up after work before they came over for dinner, no problem!  You don't have to marinate the chicken ahead of time and the chicken is still super flavorful. Using bone-in and skin-on chicken helps.  I'd recommend using organic chicken if you can here since you'll be eating the skin, which is actually really good for you and super delicious if it's crispy, too.  The vegetables get all caramelized in the oven and all of it gets tossed with the garlicky, herby, tangy, sticky, sweet maple-y sauce.  I'd call that a win.


Maple-Roasted Sheet Pan Chicken with Caramelized Acorn Squash + Fennel 

serves 4

1 lb chicken, bone-in, skin on (use any mix of breast, thighs and/ or legs you like, use organic if you can)
1/2 an acorn squash
1 medium onion (white or yellow is good here)
1 medium bulb fennel

sauce
1/4 c maple syrup
1/4 c avocado oil (or olive oil)
juice of 1 lemon
2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
1/2 t red pepper flakes
fresh rosemary, finely chopped (or 1-2 t dried)
fresh thyme, finely chopped (or 1-2 t dried)
1 t salt
1/2 t freshly cracked black pepper

Preheat oven to 425 °F.  In a glass measuring cup, whisk together the maple syrup, avocado oil, lemon juice, garlic, red pepper flakes, rosemary, thyme, salt, and pepper together and set aside.  

Cut an acorn squash in half lengthwise and scoop out the seeds.  Reserve one half for another time.  Slice the other half into 1/4 inch half moons.  Peel the onion and slice in half lengthwise, leaving the root intact.  Slice each half into 1/4 inch wedges, being sure to leave a bit of the root at the end of each wedge to hold it together in one piece.  Trim the top and bottom of the fennel bulb and slice the same way as the onion into 1/4 inch wedges.  Add the vegetables to a half sheet pan and drizzle with half the sauce and toss to coat.  Spread out in a single layer and nestle the chicken in with the vegetables, being sure to allow the chicken to make contact with the surface of the pan, rather that sitting on the vegetables.  Drizzle the remaining sauce over the chicken and toss to coat.  Roast for about 45 minutes or so, until the skin of the chicken is golden brown and crisp, the vegetables are all caramelized, and sauce has reduced slightly.  You can also check the internal temperature of the chicken with a meat thermometer to be safe.  (I like to!).  It should register to at least 165 °F.  Enjoy!

Maple-Roasted Sheet Pan Chicken with Caramelized Acorn Squash + Fennel | All Purpose Flour Child
Maple-Roasted Sheet Pan Chicken with Caramelized Acorn Squash + Fennel | All Purpose Flour Child
Maple-Roasted Sheet Pan Chicken with Caramelized Acorn Squash + Fennel | All Purpose Flour Child
Maple-Roasted Sheet Pan Chicken with Caramelized Acorn Squash + Fennel | All Purpose Flour Child
Maple-Roasted Sheet Pan Chicken with Caramelized Acorn Squash + Fennel | All Purpose Flour Child
Maple-Roasted Sheet Pan Chicken with Caramelized Acorn Squash + Fennel | All Purpose Flour Child
Maple-Roasted Sheet Pan Chicken with Caramelized Acorn Squash + Fennel | All Purpose Flour Child
Maple-Roasted Sheet Pan Chicken with Caramelized Acorn Squash + Fennel | All Purpose Flour Child

Figgy Brownies With Cacao Nib + Rose Dukkah Sprinkles

 
Figgy Brownies with Cacao Nib + Rose Dukkah Sprinkles | All Purpose Flour Child

I was flipping through the fig section of one of my favorite cookbooks the other day, Yossi Arefi's Sweeter Off The Vine, looking for fig inspiration.  I came across her recipe for soft chocolate cake with figs and I pondered the combination of figs and chocolate for a moment.  I'd never tried it but it sounded different and interesting in the best way so I thought about a brownie.  Turns out the combo is incredible. 

These brownies in particular are quite fudgy and rich themselves due to the high level of chocolate to flour ratio, which is the ideal brownie if you ask me.  The chewy figs with their soft sweetness complement the chocolate really well and their flavor intensifies in the oven.  The dukkah sprinkles are a fun and unexpected addition and really add a lot to the brownies.  Dukkah, if you're not familiar is a Middle-Eastern spice blend most commonly used in savory dishes but I've made a sweet variation here.  Dukkahs usually have a mix of toasted nuts and seeds and plenty of aromatic spices.  The dukkah recipe makes a good amount so I've been sprinkling the leftovers on yogurt and it's so good!  The aroma alone is enough to draw you in but the complex flavor is both cozy and familiar and exotic and new.  It's super easy to put together, too and feel free to adapt it.  I know most of you probably don't have dried edible rose petals lying around so feel free to put in whatever spices and additions you'd like.  Don't like pistachios?  Try hazelnuts!  Use clove or anise instead of cardamom.  Experiment and make it your own!    


Figgy Brownies With Cacao Nib + Rose Dukkah Sprinkles

makes 16 brownies

brownies
12 oz dark chocolate, roughly chopped (I'd recommend 60% or darker)
1/2 c (1 stick) unsalted butter
3 eggs, room temperature
1 T instant espresso powder
2 t vanilla extract
3/4 c organic cane sugar
1/4 c brown sugar
1/2 c flour
1 1/2 t baking powder
1/2 t Himalayan pink salt
10-15 figs, washed and thinly sliced lengthwise

dukkah
1/2 c shelled pistachio, toasted and finely chopped
1/4 c white sesame seeds
1/4 c cacao nibs
1 t ground cinnamon
1/4 t ground cardamom
1 t fennel seeds
1 t coriander seeds
2 T raw turbinado sugar
2 T dried rose petals (culinary grade)
1/2 t flaky sea salt

make the brownies
Preheat the oven to 350 °F.  In a heavy-bottomed saucepan over medium-low heat, melt the chocolate and butter together until smooth.  Meanwhile, in a large bowl, combine the eggs, vanilla, sugars, and espresso powder together and whisk until smooth. Add the melted chocolate mixture and stir to incorporate.  Stir in the flour, baking powder, and salt.  Pour batter into a parchment-lined quarter sheet pan (or a 9x13 in baking dish works too).  Arrange fig slices on top and bake for about 30-35 minutes, until a toothpick comes out clean.  They may still feel a bit squidgy but that's good because these are fudgy brownies!  Allow to cool then slice.

make the dukkah 
In a skillet over medium heat, add the sesame seeds and cacao nibs and toast until sesame seeds are golden and fragrant. Meanwhile, crush the fennel and coriander seeds in a mortar and pestle if you have one, or just place in a resealable bag and give them a good whack with your rolling pin.  They don't need to be a fine powder, just roughly crushed.  Add the sesame seeds and cacao nibs to a bowl and add the pistachios, cinnamon, cardamom, raw sugar, crushed fennel and coriander seeds, rose petals, and flaky salt. Toss gently to combine.  To serve, add a dollop of soft whipped cream or ice cream to a brownie and sprinkle generously with dukkah.

Figgy Brownies with Cacao Nib + Rose Dukkah Sprinkles | All Purpose Flour Child
Figgy Brownies with Cacao Nib + Rose Dukkah Sprinkles | All Purpose Flour Child
Figgy Brownies with Cacao Nib + Rose Dukkah Sprinkles | All Purpose Flour Child
Figgy Brownies with Cacao Nib + Rose Dukkah Sprinkles | All Purpose Flour Child
Figgy Brownies with Cacao Nib + Rose Dukkah Sprinkles | All Purpose Flour Child
Figgy Brownies with Cacao Nib + Rose Dukkah Sprinkles | All Purpose Flour Child
Figgy Brownies with Cacao Nib + Rose Dukkah Sprinkles | All Purpose Flour Child
Figgy Brownies with Cacao Nib + Rose Dukkah Sprinkles | All Purpose Flour Child
Figgy Brownies with Cacao Nib + Rose Dukkah Sprinkles | All Purpose Flour Child
Figgy Brownies with Cacao Nib + Rose Dukkah Sprinkles | All Purpose Flour Child

Harvest Kale Salad with Pears + Pumpkin Cornbread Croutons

 
Harvest Kale Salad with Pear + Pumpkin Cornbread Croutons | All Purpose Flour Child

This salad hums with the flavors of the season so harmoniously.  I would've never thought to combine kale and pears but I had the best salad the other day at Deru with massaged kale in this creamy tahini dressing with chunks of pear and sunflower seeds and it was surprisingly so good!  I took that combo and ran with it, adding all the Fall goods along the way.  The pumpkin cornbread croutons are kinda the star here, to be honest.  They aren't overly pumpkin-y but add a subtle sweetness and the perfect crunch to the salad.  I made an easy honey mustard vinaigrette to drizzle over and called it a day.  You could add some roasted chicken or even roasted veggies and make it a meal.  


Harvest Kale Salad with Pears + Pumpkin Cornbread Croutons

serves 6

salad
1 bunch kale, washed + roughly chopped (curly or lacinato)
1 c brussels sprouts, washed and thinly sliced (about 10 brussels sprouts)
1/2 c pomegranate arils
1 bartlett pear, cored and thinly sliced
pumpkin cornbread croutons (recipe below)
honey mustard vinaigrette (recipe below)

honey mustard vinaigrette
1/2 c olive oil
1/4 c apple cider vinegar
2 T honey
1 T dijon mustard
1 T whole grain mustard
salt and pepper, to taste

pumpkin cornbread croutons
1 c canned pumpkin purée
1 cup whole milk
2 T unsalted butter, melted
1 T honey
2 eggs, room temperature
1 1/2 c yellow cornmeal
1/2 c all purpose flour
1 T baking powder
1/2 t baking soda
1 t salt
1 T softened butter (for buttering baking dish)
1 T olive oil (for drizzling on croutons)
salt (for sprinkling on croutons)
 

make the cornbread croutons
Preheat oven to 400 °F.  Butter a 9x13 in baking dish and set aside.  In a large bowl, whisk the pumpkin purée, milk, melted butter, honey, and eggs together until combined.  In another bowl, whisk together the cornmeal, flour, baking soda, baking powder, and salt.  Whisk the dry ingredients into the wet until fully incorporated.  Add the batter to the buttered baking dish and bake for about 30-35 minutes, until golden and toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean.  Allow to cool until it's cool enough to the touch to handle.  Keep oven on in the meantime.  Turn the cornbread out onto a cutting board and slice into 1 inch cubes.  Place on a half sheet pan, drizzle with olive oil, and sprinkle with salt.  Bake for about 15-20 minutes, flipping halfway through, until golden and crispy on all sides. Allow to cool before adding to salad.

assemble the salad
Whisk together all the ingredients for the vinaigrette.  Toss the kale, brussels sprouts, pomegranate seeds together with as much vinaigrette as you'd like.  Top the salad with pear slices and croutons.  Enjoy!

*cornbread recipe slightly adapted from NY Times Cooking

Harvest Kale Salad with Pear + Pumpkin Cornbread Croutons | All Purpose Flour Child
Harvest Kale Salad with Pear + Pumpkin Cornbread Croutons | All Purpose Flour Child
Harvest Kale Salad with Pear + Pumpkin Cornbread Croutons | All Purpose Flour Child
Harvest Kale Salad with Pear + Pumpkin Cornbread Croutons | All Purpose Flour Child

Pumpkin Spiced + Sage Pumpkin Seed Brittle

 
Pumpkin Spiced + Sage Pumpkin Seed Brittle | All Purpose Flour Child

I recently got promoted at work so I decided to treat myself a little.  Treat yo'self two-thousand-eleven!  Or more like two-thousand-seventeen!  Guess what I bought.  A juicer.  Hahaha.  Yep, that was my big treat.  I've been wanting one for a while since I like to juice pretty often.  Even though I was making it work with my blender and a nut milk bag, it's a friggin' mess so it's not ideal.  

So a few Saturdays ago, I got up early and headed over to my favorite shopping center of all time, and walked into Williams-Sonoma right as they were unlocking the doors.  I have to say, there is something so magical and peaceful about being in a store right as it opens.  It was so relaxing and tranquil in there.  Someone offered to make me an espresso when I walked in!  I was already fully caffeinated so I passed but I appreciate the offer!   As I moved further into the store, on the hunt for my juicer,  I  was overcome with the most heavenly scent.  They had a cauldron full of fresh apple cider bubbling on the stove.  Heavenly.  I wandered over to the display of all the Fall treats and their spiced pumpkin seed brittle caught my eye.  It sounded like a brilliant idea so I decided to come up with my own!

This brittle is buttery, crisp, and full of nutty toasted pumpkin seeds .  I added plenty of warm and cozy pumpkin pie spices and dried sage for an unexpected earthy depth of flavor.  It sounds a little weird but I promise you it's so good!  It would be such a good treat to make for a Halloween party or even into Thanksgiving time to just have it out on a table for people to nosh on.   This would also be a great treat to make someone as a gift because it keeps in an airtight container for a week.  If the thought of bubbling hot sugar on the stove is a little daunting, I promise it's not as scary or difficult as it seems.  The key is to just have a pot with a nice heavy bottom so the sugar doesn't scorch before it comes up to temperature and to have a candy thermometer. And DON'T leave the room while it's cooking., I've done that one too many times.  Hope you make this and love it!  Please let me know if you do!


Pumpkin Spiced + Sage Pumpkin Seed Brittle

makes about 2 pounds  

2 c organic cane sugar
1 c light corn syrup
pinch of Himalayan pink salt
2 T grass-fed unsalted butter, room temperature
1/2 c water
2 c pumpkin seeds, unsalted and toasted
2 t vanilla extract
1/2 t baking soda
1 t pumpkin pie spice
1 t ground sage
flaky sea salt, for sprinkling on top

Combine the sugar, corn syrup, salt, and butter in a heavy-bottomed saucepan over medium heat.  Stir gently with a wooden spoon just until the butter melts and sugar is incorporated into the corn syrup and water.  Brush down the sides of the pan with a pastry brush dipped in water to prevent crystals from forming if necessary.  

When the mixture comes to a boil, attach a candy thermometer to the side of the saucepan and cook until mixture reaches 300 °F. This can take a few minutes but don't wander off!  Keep a close eye on that thermometer because the temperature will shoot up real fast if you're not watching.  Once the mixture comes to temperature, remove from heat, and working quickly, stir in the vanilla, baking soda, and spices.  The mixture will foam up and sputter a bit when you add the vanilla and baking soda but it's all good. Once all the add-ins are incorporated, stir in the pumpkin seeds.  Dump the mixture out on a silpat or parchment-lined baking sheet and spread out into an even layer.  You could also forgo the parchment and silpat and just butter the pan itself thoroughly. Sprinkle with flaky sea salt.  Allow to cool for an hour or so then snap into shards.  Store into an airtight container for up to a week.

Pumpkin Spiced + Sage Pumpkin Seed Brittle | All Purpose Flour Child
Pumpkin Spiced + Sage Pumpkin Seed Brittle | All Purpose Flour Child
Pumpkin Spiced + Sage Pumpkin Seed Brittle | All Purpose Flour Child
Pumpkin Spiced + Sage Pumpkin Seed Brittle | All Purpose Flour Child
Pumpkin Spiced + Sage Pumpkin Seed Brittle | All Purpose Flour Child
Pumpkin Spiced + Sage Pumpkin Seed Brittle | All Purpose Flour Child
Pumpkin Spiced + Sage Pumpkin Seed Brittle | All Purpose Flour Child