Pumpkin Spiced + Sage Pumpkin Seed Brittle

 
Pumpkin Spiced + Sage Pumpkin Seed Brittle | All Purpose Flour Child

I recently got promoted at work so I decided to treat myself a little.  Treat yo'self two-thousand-eleven!  Or more like two-thousand-seventeen!  Guess what I bought.  A juicer.  Hahaha.  Yep, that was my big treat.  I've been wanting one for a while since I like to juice pretty often.  Even though I was making it work with my blender and a nut milk bag, it's a friggin' mess so it's not ideal.  

So a few Saturdays ago, I got up early and headed over to my favorite shopping center of all time, and walked into Williams-Sonoma right as they were unlocking the doors.  I have to say, there is something so magical and peaceful about being in a store right as it opens.  It was so relaxing and tranquil in there.  Someone offered to make me an espresso when I walked in!  I was already fully caffeinated so I passed but I appreciate the offer!   As I moved further into the store, on the hunt for my juicer,  I  was overcome with the most heavenly scent.  They had a cauldron full of fresh apple cider bubbling on the stove.  Heavenly.  I wandered over to the display of all the Fall treats and their spiced pumpkin seed brittle caught my eye.  It sounded like a brilliant idea so I decided to come up with my own!

This brittle is buttery, crisp, and full of nutty toasted pumpkin seeds .  I added plenty of warm and cozy pumpkin pie spices and dried sage for an unexpected earthy depth of flavor.  It sounds a little weird but I promise you it's so good!  It would be such a good treat to make for a Halloween party or even into Thanksgiving time to just have it out on a table for people to nosh on.   This would also be a great treat to make someone as a gift because it keeps in an airtight container for a week.  If the thought of bubbling hot sugar on the stove is a little daunting, I promise it's not as scary or difficult as it seems.  The key is to just have a pot with a nice heavy bottom so the sugar doesn't scorch before it comes up to temperature and to have a candy thermometer. And DON'T leave the room while it's cooking., I've done that one too many times.  Hope you make this and love it!  Please let me know if you do!


Pumpkin Spiced + Sage Pumpkin Seed Brittle

makes about 2 pounds  

2 c organic cane sugar
1 c light corn syrup
pinch of Himalayan pink salt
2 T grass-fed unsalted butter, room temperature
1/2 c water
2 c pumpkin seeds, unsalted and toasted
2 t vanilla extract
1/2 t baking soda
1 t pumpkin pie spice
1 t ground sage
flaky sea salt, for sprinkling on top

Combine the sugar, corn syrup, salt, and butter in a heavy-bottomed saucepan over medium heat.  Stir gently with a wooden spoon just until the butter melts and sugar is incorporated into the corn syrup and water.  Brush down the sides of the pan with a pastry brush dipped in water to prevent crystals from forming if necessary.  

When the mixture comes to a boil, attach a candy thermometer to the side of the saucepan and cook until mixture reaches 300 °F. This can take a few minutes but don't wander off!  Keep a close eye on that thermometer because the temperature will shoot up real fast if you're not watching.  Once the mixture comes to temperature, remove from heat, and working quickly, stir in the vanilla, baking soda, and spices.  The mixture will foam up and sputter a bit when you add the vanilla and baking soda but it's all good. Once all the add-ins are incorporated, stir in the pumpkin seeds.  Dump the mixture out on a silpat or parchment-lined baking sheet and spread out into an even layer.  You could also forgo the parchment and silpat and just butter the pan itself thoroughly. Sprinkle with flaky sea salt.  Allow to cool for an hour or so then snap into shards.  Store into an airtight container for up to a week.

Pumpkin Spiced + Sage Pumpkin Seed Brittle | All Purpose Flour Child
Pumpkin Spiced + Sage Pumpkin Seed Brittle | All Purpose Flour Child
Pumpkin Spiced + Sage Pumpkin Seed Brittle | All Purpose Flour Child
Pumpkin Spiced + Sage Pumpkin Seed Brittle | All Purpose Flour Child
Pumpkin Spiced + Sage Pumpkin Seed Brittle | All Purpose Flour Child
Pumpkin Spiced + Sage Pumpkin Seed Brittle | All Purpose Flour Child
Pumpkin Spiced + Sage Pumpkin Seed Brittle | All Purpose Flour Child

Dad's Swedish Pancakes

 
Dad's Swedish Pancakes | All Purpose Flour Child

If there was a singular breakfast that captures my childhood: it's this one.  Waking up on a Saturday morning, this was usually the one thing my sister and I would request my dad make, even though we knew they were a once-in-a-while kinda deal.  Not because they are difficult to make, although you're basically babysitting the griddle for a good half hour.  But we had to try.  I think he knew if he said yes to us too often, they'd lose their luster and magic.  Either that or he just didn't feel like standing over the stove all morning.  

But lemme back up.  My mom is usually, happily the meal-maker in the family.  With two exceptions: the barbecue and breakfast. Those are dad's domain.  Classic fried eggs and bacon, French toast, buttermilk pancakes, omelettes Julia Child-style.  You name it, the dude would make it for us.  While these pancakes were a special occasion, once-in-a-while sort of request my dad was always sure to whip them up for sleepovers for our friends.  They have a way of dazzling people despite their humble simplicity.

It should also be noted that we are not a Swedish family.  That I know of, anyway...  And I'm not even sure if this is an authentic Swedish recipe.  Probably not.  When I was putting this post together the other day, I FaceTimed my dad and asked him where he'd gotten the recipe.  He told me one of his childhood friend's mom would make it for them when he spent the night.  They weren't Swedish, either, by the way.  I love that he loved them so much, he asked for the recipe and would later make them for his own kid's sleepovers.  He also noted that he's never once written the recipe down.  "It's all up here", as he pointed to his brain. Classic dad.  

You may be thinking "aren't these just basically crepes?".  Not exactly.  They are much less eggy and the batter is a lot thicker than a traditional crepe batter as well.  The thicker batter results in a more freeform rustic shape and a slightly thicker pancake than a crepe.  They are every bit as delicious though, I can't vouch for that.  We like to eat them two ways: with both variations you start by spreading a generous schmear of butter on the surface, then you can either top with jam or jelly of your choice (we like raspberry) or cinnamon sugar.  My sister has grown accustomed to doing both but I'm a purist so I like them both equally, but one at a time.  Kinda like how I like to dip a corndog in ketchup and mustard, but I'd never dream of mixing the two together, you know? 

What kind of breakfasts did you grow up eating?  Who was the breakfast king (or queen) in your home?


Dad's Swedish Pancakes

makes about 10 pancakes

1 c all purpose flour
1 c whole milk
1 egg
3 T unsalted butter, melted
3 T organic cane sugar

to serve
softened butter
raspberry jam
cinnamon sugar (recipe below)

cinnamon sugar
1/2 c organic cane sugar
1 T cinnamon
pinch of salt

Stir together the sugar, cinnamon, and salt and set aside.  Heat a nonstick griddle or large skillet over medium-low heat.  In a large bowl, whisk together the milk, eggs, and butter.  Slowly whisk in the flour and sugar until batter is smooth.  Pour about a quarter cup of the batter into the center of the griddle and spread the batter out in a concentric circle with a large spoon by starting in the center and swirling outward until the pancake is about the size of a dinner plate.  This is easier to do on a griddle or a skillet with low sides so you can keep the spoon almost parallel with the pan as you spread out the batter.  Cook for about 3 minutes until lightly golden then flip over and cook about another minute or two until other side is lightly golden.

to serve
These are best warm so as soon as they come off the griddle, spread with butter and top with jam or cinnamon sugar, your choice! Roll up like you would an enchilada.  Eat with your hands, no fork required.
 

Dad's Swedish Pancakes | All Purpose Flour Child
Dad's Swedish Pancakes | All Purpose Flour Child
Dad's Swedish Pancakes | All Purpose Flour Child
Dad's Swedish Pancakes | All Purpose Flour Child
Dad's Swedish Pancakes | All Purpose Flour Child
Dad's Swedish Pancakes | All Purpose Flour Child
Dad's Swedish Pancakes | All Purpose Flour Child
Dad's Swedish Pancakes | All Purpose Flour Child

Fig + Ricotta Tartines with Spiced Honey

 
Fig + Ricotta Tartines with Spiced Honey | All Purpose Flour Child

I really do love Summer and I don't wanna be a complainer, but I am so STOKED that Fall is finally on the horizon.  Is it just me, or does it seem like this Summer has been extra long and extra hot all around?  The forecast in Seattle this coming week is supposed to be chillier temperatures (like mid-60's, guys!) and even a chance of rain (!).  Yay.  My sweater collection is rejoicing.  Can you tell I was born and raised in the PNW?

Perhaps even more than I enjoy the actual season of Autumn, though, is the little sliver of time that exists for just a moment between seasons.  It's kinda magic.  The days are still long and bright but the nights get a little crisper, school buses are whizzing by again and the rattling of bronzed leaves flitter across the roads, and gardens are still bursting with the last of the tomatoes but things like figs starting showing up.  Which brings me to this recipe.  Figs are such a special and interesting fruit that I find they are sometimes best left un-fussed with.  Here we have them starring in a delicious little snack/breakfast/cheese course/dessert kind of deal.  They are simply enhanced by some tasty flavors and textures, like creamy, rich ricotta and spice-laden honey, but the figs really hold their own.  Enjoy!


Fig + Ricotta Tartines with Spiced Honey

serves 4

4 slices rustic bread (I used a rosemary sourdough)
1 c whole milk ricotta, divided
10 figs, washed and quartered (whatever variety you'd like)
1/4 c honey (raw, if you can find it)
1/4 t black pepper, freshly cracked
1/4 t ground cinnamon
1/4 t ground cardamom
1/4 c unsalted pistachios, toasted and roughly chopped
flaky sea salt, to finish

make the spiced honey
In a small saucepan, combine the honey, black pepper, cinnamon, and cardamom.  Heat over low heat, just until consistency of honey thins out to about the consistency of maple syrup.  Remove from heat and set aside while you assemble the tartines.

assemble the tartines
Toast the bread and spread each slice with about a quarter cup of ricotta.  Arrange sliced figs on top.  Drizzle with honey and sprinkle with pistachios and flaky salt.

Fig + Ricotta Tartines with Spiced Honey | All Purpose Flour Child
Fig + Ricotta Tartines with Spiced Honey | All Purpose Flour Child
Fig + Ricotta Tartines with Spiced Honey | All Purpose Flour Child
Fig + Ricotta Tartines with Spiced Honey | All Purpose Flour Child
Fig + Ricotta Tartines with Spiced Honey | All Purpose Flour Child
Fig + Ricotta Tartines with Spiced Honey | All Purpose Flour Child
Fig + Ricotta Tartines with Spiced Honey | All Purpose Flour Child
Fig + Ricotta Tartines with Spiced Honey | All Purpose Flour Child
Fig + Ricotta Tartines with Spiced Honey | All Purpose Flour Child

Moscow Mule Granita

 
Moscow Mule Granita | All Purpose Flour Child

I love a good moscow mule.  It's one of my favorite cocktails to order, especially at Duke's for happy hour.  And especially on Alki in the Summer sitting on the patio.  I mean, hello THIS VIEW!  The patio looks over the Puget Sound and is literally across the street from the beach.  Needless to say, if you want a seat for happy hour, you gotta get there EARLY.

So, when I was watching The Mind of A Chef recently and saw April Bloomfield make a moscow mule snowcone, I was like, whoa, that's genius!  So, here we are.  This recipe is so easy to make and really fun to sip on.  And the best part is, when it melts, it doesn't become diluted since your "ice" is pure ginger beer. So awesome, right?


Moscow Mule Granita

serves 4

4 12 oz bottles ginger beer
zest of 4 limes
8 oz (1 cup) vodka, divided
4 oz lime juice, divided
lime wheels, to garnish

Combine lime zest and ginger beer into a 9x13 inch baking dish and freeze for 30 minutes. Scrape mixture with a fork every 30 minutes, for 2 hours, or so until mixture is completely frozen and fluffy ice crystals have formed.  

Scoop mixture into copper mugs, pour 2 oz vodka and 1 oz of lime juice over each mug and garnish with a lime wheel.

Moscow Mule Granita | All Purpose Flour Child
Moscow Mule Granita | All Purpose Flour Child
Moscow Mule Granita | All Purpose Flour Child
Moscow Mule Granita | All Purpose Flour Child
Moscow Mule Granita | All Purpose Flour Child
Moscow Mule Granita | All Purpose Flour Child
Moscow Mule Granita | All Purpose Flour Child
Moscow Mule Granita | All Purpose Flour Child
Moscow Mule Granita | All Purpose Flour Child
Moscow Mule Granita | All Purpose Flour Child

Vanilla Plum Butter With Thyme + Spelt Biscuits // Sponsored By Cook Flavoring Company


Vanilla Plum Butter With Thyme Spelt Biscuits // Sponsored By Cook Flavoring Company | All Purpose Flour Child

To be honest, I like plums but I kinda overlook them.  I usually go straight for the peaches, nectarines, and cherries when stone fruit starts hitting farmer's markets and grocery stores.  My friend, Holly has two plum trees in her yard and more plums than she knows what to do with. She brought in a huge bag and said "here, you want some?".  I didn't at the time.  I didn't know what to do with them.  So they went to other homes.  But then I started thinking about what I could've done with them, and a preserve came to mind.  Now I'm kinda kicking myself for turning down free plums but live and learn.  The tart, rich flavor of the plums is the perfect match for the intoxicating and exotic aroma of fresh vanilla beans so I partnered with my friends at Cook Flavoring Company to make this delicious vanilla plum butter.  

Cook Flavoring Company has been a family-owned and run operation producing the highest quality vanilla extracts and flavorings for 100 years.  The company's dedication to crafting only the best vanilla is achieved through their bean-to-bottle approach, taking great care with each step of the production process.  It begins with their commitment to the farmers they buy from.  Cook Flavoring strives to build relationships with farmers and invest in their communities by helping to build schools and foster trust.  In turn, they are able to purchase only the best vanilla beans at the peak of harvest.  The company cures their own beans after harvest and never exposes their extracts to heat as other companies do but rather use a slower cold extraction method to ensure the highest quality and flavor you can buy.  Cook Flavoring Company produces over 200 types of vanilla and flavorings so be sure to check out their selection online or find a location that sells Cook's near you.

When it was bubbling away on my stove, it was a 70 degree day outside but it still gave me all the cozy feelings that go along with being tucked away inside on a chilly day and having something warm cooking away on the stove.  It's so comforting and I'm just gonna say it: I can't wait for Fall!  I'm ready.  And naturally we need something to smother this butter on so I made some earthy and wholesome thyme and spelt biscuits and they are the perfect accompaniment.


Vanilla Plum Butter With Thyme + Spelt Biscuits
 

makes about 8 biscuits and 4 c plum butter

plum butter
4 lbs plums (any variety you can get your hands on, I used a mix of red and black)
2 1/2 c organic cane sugar sugar
1/2 c water
2 vanilla beans, split in half lengthwise and pod reserved
juice of 1 lemon

biscuits
1 c all purpose flour, plus more for dusting work surface
1 c spelt flour (you could also use whole wheat flour or use just all purpose flour)
1/2 c butter (1 stick), cold and cubed
1/4 t Himalayan pink salt
1 1/2 t baking powder
3/4 c buttermilk
flaky sea salt, for topping
2 T fresh thyme, roughly chopped, divided
heavy cream or half and half, for brushing tops

make the plum butter
Slice the plums in half and then cut each half into rough wedges.  Add them to a heavy-bottomed 4 quart (or larger) pot along with the sugar, water, lemon juice.  Cut each vanilla bean in half lengthwise and scrape out the seeds, adding them to the pot.  Add in the scraped pods as well.  Bring to a boil over high heat, reducing to medium-high once the mixture begins to boil.  Cook for about 15-20 minutes, until plums are very tender and have started to break down.  Remove vanilla bean pods and discard.  Transfer mixture to a blender and puree.  Return to pot and cook on low until mixture has reduced to a consistency somewhere between heavy cream and yogurt.  It will also thicken more as it cools.  Remove from heat and allow to cool then transfer to glass jars.  Store in fridge for up to a month.

make the biscuits
Preheat oven to 425 F.  In a large bowl, combine the flours, baking powder, salt and 1 tablespoon of the thyme.  Stir to combine. Using a pastry blender or your hands, cut the butter into the flour mixture until the butter resembles the size of peas.  Stir in the buttermilk until just combined.  Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and pat the dough into about 1 inch thickness. Using a 3 inch round biscuit cutter (a glass works, too!), cut out the biscuits.  Transfer biscuits to a cast-iron skillet, about 1/2 an inch apart.  Brush tops with heavy cream and sprinkle with flaky salt and the reserved tablespoon of thyme.  Bake for about 25-30 minutes, until deeply golden brown and puffed.  Allow to cool slightly before serving.  Smother warm biscuits with the plum butter.
 

Vanilla Plum Butter With Thyme Spelt Biscuits // Sponsored By Cook Flavoring Company | All Purpose Flour Child
Vanilla Plum Butter With Thyme Spelt Biscuits // Sponsored By Cook Flavoring Company | All Purpose Flour Child
Vanilla Plum Butter With Thyme Spelt Biscuits // Sponsored By Cook Flavoring Company | All Purpose Flour Child
Vanilla Plum Butter With Thyme Spelt Biscuits // Sponsored By Cook Flavoring Company | All Purpose Flour Child
Vanilla Plum Butter With Thyme Spelt Biscuits // Sponsored By Cook Flavoring Company | All Purpose Flour Child
Vanilla Plum Butter With Thyme Spelt Biscuits // Sponsored By Cook Flavoring Company | All Purpose Flour Child
Vanilla Plum Butter With Thyme Spelt Biscuits // Sponsored By Cook Flavoring Company | All Purpose Flour Child
Vanilla Plum Butter With Thyme Spelt Biscuits // Sponsored By Cook Flavoring Company | All Purpose Flour Child
Vanilla Plum Butter With Thyme Spelt Biscuits // Sponsored By Cook Flavoring Company | All Purpose Flour Child
Vanilla Plum Butter With Thyme Spelt Biscuits // Sponsored By Cook Flavoring Company | All Purpose Flour Child
Vanilla Plum Butter With Thyme Spelt Biscuits // Sponsored By Cook Flavoring Company | All Purpose Flour Child
Vanilla Plum Butter With Thyme Spelt Biscuits // Sponsored By Cook Flavoring Company | All Purpose Flour Child
Vanilla Plum Butter With Thyme Spelt Biscuits // Sponsored By Cook Flavoring Company | All Purpose Flour Child
Vanilla Plum Butter With Thyme Spelt Biscuits // Sponsored By Cook Flavoring Company | All Purpose Flour Child
Vanilla Plum Butter With Thyme Spelt Biscuits // Sponsored By Cook Flavoring Company | All Purpose Flour Child
Vanilla Plum Butter With Thyme Spelt Biscuits // Sponsored By Cook Flavoring Company | All Purpose Flour Child

This post is sponsored by Cook Flavoring Company.  All opinions stated are my own and I only promote products I love and use. Thanks for supporting the brands that support me!


Cocktail-Inspired | The Old Fashioned X S'mores!

 
Cocktail-Inspired: The Old Fashioned x S'mores! | All Purpose Flour Child

I adore the flavors of an old fashioned.  I love it so much, I even turned it into a coffee cocktail here (or here!).  But really, what's not to love?  Bright and zesty orange, dark caramelized raw sugar, syrupy sweet and fruity cherries, and warming, throat-clearing bourbon.  All equally good stand-alone flavors and even better together.

These s'mores have all those flavors going on and more.  First, we have a crisp and snappy cookie spiked with tons of orange zest, brown sugar, and the edges are even dipped in raw turbinado sugar for that extra crunch.  I think the mallows might be may favorite part, though.  No, they definitely are.  They are full of rich and sweet luxardo cherries, a good dash of angostura bitters, and get this: BOURBON.  Yes, my friends.  These are boozy marshmallows and they are every bit as delicious as they sound. Sidebar: my sister loves luxardo cherries so much that every time she comes over, she requests a beverage with them.  (We both know the beverages is just a formality when all she's really after is the cherry but I won't tell if you don't).  So, when I was testing this recipe and she saw I was sacrificing a whole 1/4 cup of them for marshmallows, she was horrified.  Until she tried them.  So, ya. They're pretty damn good.  And while yes, these are definitely more high-maintenance than your standard classic s'more, they are worth it.  I think they'd be perfect for an unexpected dessert for a Summer dinner party or get together.  Or just cause you feel like it.


The Old Fashioned x S'mores 

makes about 16 s'mores

for the bourbon cherry marshmallows
3 envelopes gelatin (0.75 oz), such as Knox
1/2 c cold water
1/2 c bourbon
1 1/2 c granulated organic cane sugar
1 c light corn syrup
1/2 t Himalayan pink salt
1/4 c maraschino cherries, roughly chopped (such as Luxardo)
5 dashes angostura bitters
powdered sugar for dusting
coconut oil, for greasing pan

for the brown sugar + orange sable
1/2 c (1 stick) unsalted butter, room temperature
1/2 c brown sugar
1 egg, room temperature
zest of 1 organic orange (about 1 tablespoon)
1 1/2 c all purpose flour
pinch of Himalayan pink salt
1/3 c turbinado sugar, for coating edges
2 12 oz bars dark chocolate, broken into squares 

make the marshmallows
Start by preparing a 9x12 inch baking dish by lining with parchment, leaving a few inches of extra hanging over either side. Sprinkle generously with a thick dusting of powdered sugar.  Set aside. In the bowl of an electric mixer, combine the gelatin and water and set aside while you make the syrup.

In a medium, heavy-bottomed saucepan, combine the bourbon, granulated sugar, corn syrup, and salt and bring to boil at medium heat.  Continue to let the mixture bubble until it reaches 240 degrees (soft ball stage). With the mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, slowly drizzle the syrup in over the gelatin with the mixer on medium-low.  After you've added all the syrup, turn the mixer up to high and let it beat for about 10-15 minutes until the mixture is thick, glossy and white.  Turn off the mixer and add in the dashes of bitters then fold in the cherries with a rubber spatula until evenly dispersed.  Add the mixture to your prepared baking dish and smooth out top with a spatula.  Sprinkle the top with more powdered sugar to cover and let sit for about 8 hours, or overnight before slicing.

Generously dust a cutting board with powdered sugar.  Using the parchment paper, lift the marshmallows out of the baking pan and transfer to the cutting board.  Using a chef's knife dusted in powdered sugar, slice the marshmallows into about 2 inch squares.  Roll the sticky sides of the marshmallows in powdered sugar.  Set aside until ready to assemble the s'mores.  

make the sables
In the bowl of a stand mixer, beat together the butter and brown sugar until fluffy.  Add the egg and orange zest and beat again until combined.  Add the flour and salt and beat until just combined.  Wrap dough in plastic wrap and form into a disc.  Refrigerate for at least an hour before rolling out.

Preheat oven to 350 F.  On a floured surface, roll the dough out to about 1/4 inch thick rectangle.  Using a sharp knife or pizza cutter along with a ruler to keep edges straight, cut dough into about 2 inch squares.  Pour the raw sugar into a shallow dish and dip all 4 edges of the cookies in the sugar.  Arrange squares on a parchment or silpat-lined baking sheet about 1 inch apart and bake for about 12-15 minutes, or until golden brown and crisp.  Allow to cool before assembling s'mores.

assemble the s'mores
Arrange a square of chocolate on one side of sable cookie and set aside.  Skewer the marshmallow on a wooden or metal kebab skewer and toast over open flame until golden brown.  If you don't have a camp or bonfire handy, you could do this over a gas stove burner, using a culinary torch, or even under the broiler of your oven for a few minutes!  Just lay the marshmallows out on a foil-lined baking sheet and keep an eye on them.  Top the chocolate with a marshmallow and add another sable on top to make your s'more. Enjoy!

Cocktail-Inspired: The Old Fashioned x S'mores! | All Purpose Flour Child
Cocktail-Inspired: The Old Fashioned x S'mores! | All Purpose Flour Child
Cocktail-Inspired: The Old Fashioned x S'mores! | All Purpose Flour Child
Cocktail-Inspired: The Old Fashioned x S'mores! | All Purpose Flour Child

Cocktail-Inspired | Piña Colada x S'mores!

 
Cocktail-Inspired: Piña Colada x S'mores! | All Purpose Flour Child

I can't actually recall ever having a true piña colada cocktail but I do love the combination of pineapple and coconut together. These s'mores are a tropical vacation in your own backyard.  The marshmallows are full of coconutty flavor and even rolled in toasted coconut for maximum crunch.  The cookie is sweet, crisp, and full of coconut too and the fresh pineapple is grilled alongside the mallow to caramelized perfection.  Add a little dark chocolate and you're in business.  Enjoy!


Piña Colada S'mores

makes about 16 s'mores

for the marshmallows
3 envelopes gelatin (0.75 oz), such as Knox
1 c cold water, divided
1 1/2 c granulated organic cane sugar
1 c light corn syrup
1/2 t Himalayan pink salt
1 t coconut extract
powdered sugar for dusting
coconut oil, for greasing pan
1/2 c unsweetened shredded coconut, toasted

for the toasted coconut sable
1/2 c (1 stick) unsalted butter, room temperature
1/2 c brown sugar
1 egg, room temperature
1/2 t coconut extract
1 1/2 c all purpose flour
pinch of Himalayan pink salt
1/4 c unsweetened shredded coconut, toasted

4 1/4 inch rounds of fresh pineapple, cored and quartered
1/4 c brown sugar, for coating pineapple
2 12 oz bars dark chocolate, broken into squares 

make the marshmallows
Start by preparing a 9x12 inch baking dish.  Lightly grease the sides and bottom of the baking pan with coconut oil then line the baking pan with a piece of parchment so that a few inches hang over either side of the pan.  We'll use these later to easily lift the marshmallows out of the pan.  Grease the parchment with a little more coconut oil then dust the whole thing generously with powdered sugar.  Set aside.  In the bowl of an electric mixer, combine the gelatin and 1/2 a cup of the water and set aside while you make the syrup.

In a medium, heavy-bottomed saucepan, combine the remaining 1/2 cup of water, granulated sugar, corn syrup, and salt and bring to boil at medium heat.  Continue to let the mixture bubble until it reaches 240 degrees (soft ball stage). With the mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, slowly drizzle the syrup in over the gelatin with the mixer on medium-low.  After you've added all the syrup, turn the mixer up to high and let it beat for about 10-15 minutes until the mixture is thick, glossy and white.  Beat in the coconut extract until combined.  Add the mixture to your prepared baking dish and smooth out top with a spatula.  Sprinkle the top with more powdered sugar to cover and let sit for about 8 hours, or overnight before slicing.  

Generously dust a cutting board with powdered sugar.  Using the parchment paper, lift the marshmallows out of the baking pan and transfer to the cutting board.  Using a chef's knife dusted in powdered sugar, slice the marshmallows into about 2 inch squares.  Roll the sticky sides of the marshmallows in toasted coconut, leaving the top and bottom plain.  Set aside until ready to assemble the s'mores.  

make the sables
In the bowl of a stand mixer, beat together the butter and brown sugar until fluffy.  Add the egg and coconut extract and beat again until combined.  Add the flour and salt and beat until just combined.  Mix in the toasted coconut until incorporated throughout the dough.  Wrap dough in plastic wrap and form into a disc.  Refrigerate for at least 2 hours before rolling out.

Preheat oven to 350 F.  On a floured surface, roll the dough out to about 1/4 inch thick rectangle.  Using a sharp knife or pizza cutter, cut dough into about 2 inch squares.  Arrange squares on a parchment or silpat-lined baking sheet about 1 inch apart and bake for about 12-15 minutes, or until golden brown and crisp.  Allow to cool before assembling s'mores.

assemble the s'mores
Arrange a square of chocolate on one side of sable cookie and set aside.  Add the brown sugar to a small, shallow dish and coat each side of the pineapple slices in it.  On a wooden or metal skewer, add a pineapple slice and a marshmallow.  Toast over open flame until both are golden brown and caramelized.  If you don't have a camp or bonfire handy, you could do this over a gas stove burner, or a culinary torch, or even under the broiler of your oven for a few minutes!  Just lay the marshmallows and pineapple out on a foil-lined baking sheet and keep an eye on them.  Top the chocolate with the toasted marshmallow, pineapple slice, and add another sable on top to make your s'more.  Enjoy!

Cocktail-Inspired: Piña Colada x S'mores! | All Purpose Flour Child
Cocktail-Inspired: Piña Colada x S'mores! | All Purpose Flour Child
Cocktail-Inspired: Piña Colada x S'mores! | All Purpose Flour Child
Cocktail-Inspired: Piña Colada x S'mores! | All Purpose Flour Child
Cocktail-Inspired: Piña Colada x S'mores! | All Purpose Flour Child
Cocktail-Inspired: Piña Colada x S'mores! | All Purpose Flour Child
Cocktail-Inspired: Piña Colada x S'mores! | All Purpose Flour Child
Cocktail-Inspired: Piña Colada x S'mores! | All Purpose Flour Child
Cocktail-Inspired: Piña Colada x S'mores! | All Purpose Flour Child